Improvisation with the Artists and Their Work at Grounds For Sculpture

On Saturday, June 4, 2011 at 11am, 1pm & 2pm , MM2 Modern Dance will be performing at Grounds for Sculpture as part of their Anniversary Arts Party. The annual celebration of the founding of Grounds For Sculpture, offers a host of activities and events. As part of the Meet the Artists program, MM2 Modern Dance will create improvisational dance at select sculptures based on the individual artist’s interpretations, along with visitor’s input and interaction.

Dance with Sculpture is a program that directly resulted from collaboration between Grounds for Sculpture and MM2 Modern Dance Company over seven years ago after an experimental and most successful performance that occurred to a small audience of fifty. Since 2003, the collaboration between GFS and MM2 has offered 25 cross-disciplinary dance and sculpture programs, serving thousands of persons of all ages.

Dance with Sculpture has provided new and innovative interpretations and appreciation of the sculptures on the site and led to a deeper appreciation of both art forms. Feedback provided by audience members and participants has indicated that the interaction of the dancers with the sculptures and the natural environment creates an aesthetic experience that is life-enriching for all.

MM2 dancers are able to work with artists and art in the park, create new choreography and gain exposure and feedback for their works. Grounds for Sculpture attendees have also had an opportunity to observe the creation of site-specific pieces and works in progress, as MM2 rehearsed and worked at Grounds for Sculpture with specific artists/sculptors.


Tour at 11am with
Sydney Hamburger, Dana Stewart, Gyuri Hollosy

Sydney Hamburger, Huerfano, 1993, Bronze, aluminum, 168” x 264” x 120”, Courtesy of the Artist

Hamburger’s
sculptures reflect her deep interest in anthropology and what she perceives to be contemporary mankind’s sense of unease.  The works often have severe, angular elements at their base while at the top, softer more circular shapes crown the pieces, almost as if the lower portions represent the harsh reality and uncertainty of life while the upper sections create a refuge, a safe, warmer place where hope can prevail.

Dana Stewart, The Chase, 1999, Cast bronze 1/5, 60” x 60” x 60”, Courtesy of the Artist

Circling a ring of lush greenery in the sculpture park are more than a dozen bronze beasts by Dana Stewart. The individual characters are based upon the artist’s own imaginary menagerie.  Playful, whimsical and amusing at first glance, more in-depth contemplation of the fanciful creatures reveals underlying dark and somber qualities.  Grimaces, snarls, stances, and other gestures convey an array of emotions, including fear, lamentation, and aggression.  Tails, commonly recognized as an animal’s emotional barometer, are exaggerated in size in comparison to each creature’s body mass.  Long and thick, the appendages are held upright, standing erect, taut and on-guard.  The straining, extended necks and the tight lines of the textured bodies aid in relaying this tension between lighthearted whimsy and the darker range of emotions.

Gyuri Hollósy, Kathy B, 1994, Cast bronze, 72” x 27” x 17”

As a sculptor Gyuri Hollósy has been endlessly captivated with exploring and developing new approaches to the classical human figure, specifically the female form.  Hollósy’s love and fascination with Medieval armor has subconsciously influenced him over the years.  This influence has led Hollósy to discover a new sculptural approach that has emerged and evolved into what he describes as a “strongly delicate, unique and personal style.”  Although hollow and suggestive of a shell structure, Hollósy’s figures still retain strength in form and gesture.  Thin overlapping pieces of cast metal are reminiscent of armor plates and allow the viewer to experience the juxtaposition of the interior and exterior spaces.  Hollósy’s unique technique merges the traditional figure with historical references to Medieval armor resulting in an elegantly abstracted yet recognizable figure.

 

Tour at 1pm with performance at “The Jubilant Dancer” by Cliff Ward

 

Clifford Ward, Jubilant Dance, 2001, Cast bronze, 72” x 48” x 24”

Ward has combined two art forms, dance and sculpture, in his work, Jubilant Dancer.  He has long admired the talents of dancers and choreographers like Alvin Ailey, Twyla Tharp, and George Ballanchine and their ability to create an illusion of defying gravity.  This strong interest in the lines, lightness, and grace of artistic and athletic movement has inspired Ward to produce a series of sculptures.  Each figure in the series, including Jubilant Dancer, is differentiated from the others through its actions and attire.  Ward makes many of his “dancers” through a unique process that utilizes plastic wrap and various paper products; however, Jubilant Dancer was cast in bronze from a plaster model.


Tour at 2pm with
Gyuri Hollosy and Meryl Taradash

Meryl Taradash, The Caged Bird Dances II, 2001, Aluminum, stainless steel, 152” x 40” x 33”, Courtesy of the Artist

Making wind visible, Meryl Taradash’s kinetic sculpture, The Caged Bird Dances II, joins Grounds For Sculpture’s outdoor exhibition.  Composed of aluminum and stainless steel, Taradash’s sculpture incorporates a third and a fourth medium—wind and light.  Intricately engineered and gracefully balanced within two curvaceous lines, the kinetic motion radiates from within the central core of the sculpture.  The innermost spiral responds to the wind, accelerating and decelerating its rotation as it catches and reflects the light.  Like many of Taradash’s works, The Caged Bird Dances II celebrates human gesture and thought.  One is invited to experience this kinetic work, marvel at its motion, and perhaps make up a story as to why “the caged bird dances.”


Gyuri Hollósy, Kathy B, 1994, Cast bronze, 72” x 27” x 17”

As a sculptor Gyuri Hollósy has been endlessly captivated with exploring and developing new approaches to the classical human figure, specifically the female form.  Hollósy’s love and fascination with Medieval armor has subconsciously influenced him over the years.  This influence has led Hollósy to discover a new sculptural approach that has emerged and evolved into what he describes as a “strongly delicate, unique and personal style.”  Although hollow and suggestive of a shell structure, Hollósy’s figures still retain strength in form and gesture.  Thin overlapping pieces of cast metal are reminiscent of armor plates and allow the viewer to experience the juxtaposition of the interior and exterior spaces.  Hollósy’s unique technique merges the traditional figure with historical references to Medieval armor resulting in an elegantly abstracted yet recognizable figure.


Anniversary Arts Party
MM2 Modern Dance
Grounds For Sculpture
Saturday, June 4, 2011
11am – 4pm
18 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, NJ 08619 (609) 586-0616
Performance free with park admission.
http://www.groundsforsculpture.org
https://www.mm2dance.org

Grounds For Sculpture, located in Hamilton, New Jersey (midway between Philadelphia and New York), is a thirty-five acre sculpture garden and arboretum on the former site of the New Jersey State Fairgrounds. Founded by Seward Johnson to promote an understanding of and appreciation for contemporary sculpture, the park has been enchanting visitors since 1992. Grounds For Sculpture features more than 270 contemporary sculptures, and two 10,000 square foot museum galleries with rotating exhibits. In addition, the park offers workshops for children and adults, concerts, performances, fairs, shopping and fine dining at the Zagat’s-rated Rat’s Restaurant. Visit www.groundsforsculpture.org for more information.

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